Over 4 million Australians have a disability. That’s 1 in 5 people. No business can afford to ignore one in five of their customers.

why we care

because it’s a social responsibility

Accessible Websites help people with disabilities more actively participate in society - especially in critical interactions such as financial and banking.

Web accessibility is a measure of how effectively all people, including those with disabilities, are able to access and use web pages and applications. Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the web. It is a legal requirement that all Australian websites be accessible in order to provide equal access and equal opportunity to people with disabilities.

recognise disability

there are many different types

Vision impairment

  • Blindness
  • Low Vision: Macular degeneration, Glaucoma, Diabetic retinopathy, Cataract
  • Color-blindness: protanomaly, deuteranomaly, tritanomaly

Hearing

  • Conductive hearing loss - due to damage etc
  • Neural hearing loss (nerve deafness)
  • High tone hearing loss
  • Low tone hearing loss
  • Deaf-blindness

Motor disabilities

  • Traumatic Injuries: Spinal cord injury, Loss or damage of limb(s)
  • Diseases and Congenital Conditions: Cerebral palsy, Muscular dystrophy, Multiple sclerosis, Spina bifida, ALS, Arthritis, Parkinson’s disease. Essential tremor

Cognitive disabilities

  • Dyslexia
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Brain Injury: Stroke, illness, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), brain tumors, Meningitis
  • Genetic Disability: Down’s syndrome, Autism, Dementia

plan for accessibility

it shouldn’t be an after-thought

Accessibility is often an after-thought, introduced at the end of the front end development phases. However, accessibility should be included in all phases of a project:

Planning

  • Determine how accessibility will impact on the project, goals and timelines

User Experience

  • Provide customisable user interfaces
  • Use progressive disclosure to hide complexity
  • Use of icons and other visual aids
  • Avoid complex language, user-use of abbreviations or industry jargon
  • Reduce amount of horizontal scrolling for screen magnifiers

Content

  • Make sure that links make sense out of context
  • Avoid complex language, user-use of abbreviations or industry jargon

Design

  • Provide customisable user interfaces
  • Use of icons and other visual aids
  • Avoid using colour alone to convey meaning
  • Make sure foreground and background colours meet colour contrast requirements
  • Use relative rather than absolute units for font sizing

Front end development

  • Make all pages and applications keyboard accessible
  • Provide meaningful text alternatives for images
  • Allow users to skip over navigation menus etc
  • Make tables useable for screen reader users
  • Reduce amount of horizontal scrolling for screen magnifiers
  • Use relative rather than absolute units for font sizing
  • Provide alternatives for audio and video content including captioning and transcripts

listen to the experts

there’s a wealth of information available

There are plenty of free resources out there to help you get started and to steer you in the right direction. You can start with the formal guidelines to make sure your understanding of accessibility compliance is current. There are also tools to assess your work.